Official Launch: Commemorating the Centenary of the Connaught Rangers Mutiny in India 28th June 1920

An official launch for this memorial project will take place in Tubbercurry Community Library on Saturday 9th of November at 1pm.
 
The memorial project involves the erecting of an inscribed monument in Wolfe Tone Square, Tubbercurry, dedicated to the memory of the three Sligo men who took part in the mutiny: James Gorman Tubbercurry, Martin Boy Conlon Sligo town and Jack Scanlon Sligo town.
 
The project is designed to tell the story and to honour the memory of the courageous men who while far from home stood in solidarity with their native country men fighting for our Independence.
 
The proposed dedication date is June 28th, 2020 on the centenary anniversary of the mutiny.
 
In advance of the memorial, an official launch will take place in Tubbercurry Community Library.
 
Key aspects of the launch will be a series of short talks over the afternoon, by three historians on the history of the mutiny, followed by a light refreshment.
 
They include:
 
  • Dr. Eunan O’Halpin, Professor of Contemporary Irish History, Trinity College (Grandnephew of Kevin Barry).
  • Dr. Mario Draper, Professor of Modern History, Kent University.
  • Danny Tiernan, Connaught Rangers, Historian, Boyle, Co. Rosommon.
 
Each talk will be followed by a brief Q&A.
 
The memorial launch is a chance to remind ourselves of the significance of Ireland and Sligo’s forgotten heroes.
 
This is a FREE event.
 
The memorial project is part of Sligo Co Council’s Decade of Centenaries, the State Commemoration of significant historical events that took place between 1918-1923.
 
In association with the Connaught Rangers Memorial group and Creative Ireland.

                                     The Connaught Rangers Mutiny in India 1920

The Connaught Rangers were a regiment in the British army and were based in Wellington barracks Jalandhar in the Punjab India

When the news of martial law in Ireland and the reprisals by the Black and Tans reached them they protested by refusing to obey orders.

The protest spread to Solan, a military outpost near the Tibetan border, and the Rangers there led by Private James Daly, protested by grounding arms and refusing to obey orders

In August 88 mutineers were court- martialled at army headquarters at Simla seventy seven were sentenced to various terms of imprisonment, 10 were acquitted, 14 were sentenced to death, 13 had had their sentences commuted to life in prison and some were given up to 20 years penal servitude.

Private James Daly, spokesperson for the Rangers in Salon, was executed by firing squad on November 2nd. 1920 and was the last member of the British forces to be executed for mutiny.

The Rangers were returned to England to serve the remainder of their sentences

After a number of weeks they were removed to prisons around England.

The Connaught Ranger mutineers were released on January 2nd. 1923 following an amnesty as part of the signing of the Anglo Irish Treaty.

They returned to Ireland and became Ireland’s forgotten hero’s with families and communities seldom knowing all of the hardship they endured

In 1970 the remains of James Daly Peter Sears and Patrick Smyth were repatriated to Ireland

James Daly was buried in Tyrrellspass Co Westmeath. Patrick Symth and Peter Sears are buried in Glasnevin cemetery Dublin.